Ginger Spiced Tilapia

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IMG_20150328_205913_831     And a meal is born! My wife informed me the other evening that I was preparing fish and asked how I was serving it. I hadn’t a clue other than ‘to cook it’.

Usually it involves lime juice, cilantro, garlic, some oil, my go to stuff. I wanted something different and remembered the fresh ginger. That’s when it hit me.

I sliced off three thin slices of ginger root, trimmed and minced them, grabbed the sesame seeds, some cayenne pepper flake, coconut oil and the pound of tilapia.

I put about a tablespoon of the coconut oil in a skillet and let that heat up. I then added a Tbsp sesame seed, the minced ginger and a couple shakes of the red pepper. This cooked for a couple of minutes, just long enough to make a beautiful aroma, and the ginger and sesame started to darken a little.

IMG_20150328_204741_484      The tilapia fillets were laid gently over the bed of seasoned goodness and cooked for about three minutes per side.

This was served with mixed vegetables that were rather boring next to the fish.  Last minute thought, remember?

So there you have it, a quick, simple, healthy and nutritious meal that was thrown together in under twenty minutes. Now what am I going to make tonight…?

In fitness, Bob

International Waffle Day = More Protein

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Why would a personal fitness trainer talk about waffles? Let’s start with some background.

Today is celebrated as Waffle Day. This is also celebrated on August 24th in honor of the first waffle iron by Cornelius Swarthout in 1869. Waffles originated in Greece around the 13th century. Waffle celebrations coincide as a welcoming of Spring.

Waffle calorie counts can range from 82 per ounce to over 400 per waffle. The majority of the macro-nutrients in a waffle are carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are a beneficial fuel source, but for some they are restricted in their diet. If not monitored, carbs quickly become sugar and an ensuing ‘crash’ occurs.

This is where more protein can come into play. Pairing protein with carbohydrates, helps to slow the absorption of sugar from the stomach into the bloodstream. This will help keep blood sugar from spiking, which can lead to future cravings.

Adding more protein to your diet will help you burn more calories due to the thermic effect of food. That is the energy required to digest it.

In short, enjoy that waffle today, be modest with the toppings, add some protein to the meal, then do some exercise.

In fitness, Bob

My First 5k Goal: Mission Accomplished

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This is a true testimonial of perseverance. A story from someone not unlike you or I, and probably similar to someone you know. A friend, relative, or even a coworker, just an ordinary person that is not a celebrity to have their successes blasted all over the media to gain attention.
For some to look back and think, three miles was nothing, to a beginner on a long journey, this is truly phenomenal.
I always embrace hearing stories of successes, because to that individual it is greater than the universe. To feel their excitement, struggle, achievement, pain and accomplishment it very uplifting.
This is my wife’s story of running her first 5k. Overcoming morbid obesity and the challenges that came with it, are being left, piece by piece with every step to success.
I hope you enjoy her story and remember the struggles that you have overcome to be the person that you are today.
In fitness, Bob

No Glass Slippers Here!

My First 5k Goal:  Mission Accomplished

March 23, 2015

In the winter of 2013, I made myself a goal.  With my increased energy and growing love of fitness, I had promised myself that I would be able to run a 5k.  As it turned out, my life became so busy that the summer of 2014 was gone in a blink of an eye.  Over the winter, I found a special love/hate relationship with running.  I dread doing it, but when I do all of my worries fade away.  I pick up the beat and I feel free again.  My inner tiger is all happy again.  So in January, in the midst of a back slide of depression and weight gain, I revisited that goal.  With some help and encouragement from new friends, a few co-workers and my wonderful personal trainer husband, I felt it was a goal I could reach…

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BUTTERY CRABMEAT – TOPPED COD WITH ONIONS – PARMESAN – DILL – PARSLEY / RED INCA QUINOA

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Here is a decadent sounding recipe from Celia that I cannot wait to try. I will substitute stevia for the sugar though. Quinoa and fish are already a winning combo in my book. Mix in some crab meat and dill, and I can almost taste it. Maybe a light sprinkling of roasted almond slivers, …Oh yeah, gotta try this one!

THE MEDITERRANEAN MICROWAVE

Note:  The web site says this entrée tastes like lobster, and I agree.

–cod (size of 3 decks of cards; one-half pound)

–crabmeat (1 can)

–onion (one-half, medium)

–dill

–parsley (fresh if possible)

–Parmesan cheese

–sugar (2 tablespoons)

–lemon juice

–buttery crackers (about 6, Ritz or Breton)

–garlic powder

–salt and pepper

–olive oil

–Promise Activ margarine (2 tablespoons, heart-healthy)

 

1 – Slice the one-half onion, and place in a covered baking dish.  Add a little water, and season with salt, pepper, and olive oil.  Microwave on high for 3 minutes.  Set aside.  Place 2 tablespoons of sugar in a half cup of water, and microwave for 30 seconds.  Set aside.  Place 2 tablespoons of margarine in a bowl, and heat for 20 seconds.  Set aside.

2 – Place two-thirds cup of quinoa in a covered baking dish.  Add 1 and one-third cup of water.  Season with salt and…

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Good Sitting Posture For Health Benefit

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Sitting affects all of us and the negative impact is worsening due in part to electronics. Whether it is at work, home or in the car, we spend a lot of time sitting. Having been a professional truck driver for many years, I am very aware of the time spent sitting.
This video offers some very good alternatives and suggestions to help get you through your seated day. In fitness, Bob

Heart Disease in Women

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Can you believe that at the age of 30, physical inactivity begins to play it’s largest role in a woman’s risk of developing heart disease? This is according to Australian researchers, as posted in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (May 2014)

Physical inactivity is defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure. In 2008 according to the World Health Organization; globally, 31% of adults age 15 and over were insufficiently active. Of those, 28% were men and 34% were women.

From the age of 31 and beyond, inactivity raises the risk of heart disease more than smoking, being overweight or having high blood pressure.

Changing diet habits and walking thirty minutes a day or for an hour three times a week, will make a drastic change in your risk. Blood flow to the heart and the ability to pump normally can be changed in as little as a  month.

Exercise is only a fraction of the equation though. Stress management and a strict, healthy diet are crucial lifestyle changes that need to be adhered to. Following up with regular visits to your doctor, staying at a healthy weight and not smoking will greatly reduce your chance of developing heart disease as well.

It is never too early or too late, to begin a healthy lifestyle change. Find a support group, join a walking club or just ask your medical professional for advice and help. Some insurance companies will offer a discount on proactive health services. Search social media or join a discussion forum. My Fitness Pal is just one of the apps that has many group discussions, recipes, food logging tips and support opportunities.

Whatever method you choose to better yourself, just stick with it. You will develop a sense of pride and accomplishment, and just may be a role model for someone else.

In fitness, Bob